9 Sober Halloween Ideas For People In Recovery

Halloween is one of the more party-orientated holidays, so those in recovery may feel tempted to use. Sober people can still have fun on Halloween through various activities, such as visiting a pumpkin patch, watching scary films, or entering a costume contest.

Sober Halloween Ideas

During Halloween, there are plenty of gatherings that make indulging in drinking or drug abuse seem fun. But for people in recovery, a relapse can be detrimental to their physical and mental health.

Some go back to rehab after a relapse, but many give up on their recovery. So it may seem hard to enjoy Halloween, or any holiday, as a sober person, especially people new to recovery.

However, there are plenty of drug-free Halloween ideas for sober people to partake in. Below we’ll explore some ways to have fun on Halloween without a drink or drug.

Why Halloween Can Be Difficult For People In Recovery

Certain holidays with a culture of drinking, such as St. Patrick’s Day or Halloween, can be hard for sober people to celebrate.

People with substance use disorders may be reminded of past holiday parties where drinking or using drugs was the main activity.

Those going through the holiday season sober for the first time can build up anxiety and stress thinking about social gatherings where substances are indulged.

Many of these people may assume that staying away from festivities is the smart thing to do. In some cases, it may be necessary to not attend parties with old friends who still drink or use drugs.

However, this does not mean you can’t have fun. By using relapse prevention tips and engaging in sober activities, the holidays can be a memorable and productive time.

Drug-Free Ideas For A Sober Halloween

Substances play a big role in many holiday parties. It’s common to add alcohol to holiday-themed drinks or make marijuana-infused sweets.

Some carry holiday trauma that can be triggered around these types of events, such as witnessing intoxicated behavior.

But Halloween, or any holiday, doesn’t have to be centered on substances. There are plenty of ways to get into the spooky spirit and stay sober.

Below we’ve assembled nine sober activities you can enjoy as a person in recovery.

1. Enter A Costume Contest

Halloween presents a golden opportunity to show off your creative side. Join a local costume contest and take some time thinking of who or what you’ll be.

Once you land on something, take time assembling what you’ll need to make it the best costume it can be.

Finding materials and putting together a costume is a great way to flex your artistic capabilities while keeping you occupied during the holiday.

2. Visit A Pumpkin Patch

Almost everyone has childhood memories of visiting a local pumpkin patch. As we get older, we forget how much fun picking out the perfect pumpkin can be.

Bring a sober group of people with you, or go by yourself, and enjoy looking at all the different sizes of pumpkins while taking in a nice autumn afternoon.

Patches usually have other activities, such as corn mazes or hayrides, to keep your mind off of substances.

3. Carve A Pumpkin

After finding the right pumpkin, go home and carve a cool design into it. This is another Halloween tradition that many people forget about in adulthood.

Anything from comic character emblems to sports team logos will look dazzling when they’re lit from within. Look up some inspiration online, invite a few friends over, and get carving.

4. Turn Your House Into A Haunted House

Halloween calls for lots of decorating. Similar to costumes, you can get into the Halloween spirit by giving your home a spooky makeover, inside and out.

You can get creative and make your own decor, or go shopping for some new pieces. Once you feel confident that your house is scary enough, invite some friends for a get-together.

5. Host A Movie Marathon

There are plenty of horror films and family-friendly Halloween movies to watch this season.

Curate a list of scary movies to watch, make some popcorn, and gather a group of buddies to enjoy some thrills.

Films don’t have to be strictly scary or gory. Comedy, animation, and drama films can all be great ways to indulge in the holiday.

6. Pass Out Candy To Trick-Or-Treaters

Some people in active addiction may have been away from their house during Halloween, which means they missed out on the chance to pass out candy to trick-or-treaters.

Grab a bag of tasty treats at your local grocery store and prepare for a night of fun and nostalgia.

7. Make Festive Beverages And Foods

Thinking outside the box to make Halloween-themed snacks and treats is a fun way to get into the Halloween spirit.

There are plenty of Halloween-themed creatures that can influence cookies, cakes, and muffins, such as bats, ghosts, and skeletons. Green punch, pumpkin soda, and candy are always tasty treats.

8. Volunteer In Your Community

Volunteering time at a local food shelter can be a great way to take the focus off of yourself and onto your community in need.

Acts of service can help you stay sober and remind you of the gifts of sobriety. Being able to give to others through sobriety can evoke feelings of gratefulness.

9. Go To A 12-Step Group Meeting

12-step groups, such as Alcoholics Anonymous, still meet regularly during the holidays. Many times, they’ll bolster meetings with extra food, snacks, and beverages.

Attending a meeting on Halloween reminds you how great sobriety can be and gives you a chance to spend time with like-minded people.

Addiction Treatment In Massachusetts

You don’t have to let Halloween be the reason for relapse. We have many levels of care in the addiction treatment process at Spring Hill Recovery Center.

With our treatment options, such as inpatient, outpatient, and detox programs, you or your loved one can learn how to live life sober through any situation, including the holidays.

Reach out to one of our drug specialists today to learn more about our recovery center.

Written by Spring Hill Editorial Team

Published on: October 25, 2022

©2022 Spring Hill Recovery Center | All Rights Reserved

This page does not provide medical advice.

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